About Duznot

Remember: When going to Japan to study, creating a blog isn't just a good idea, it's the LAW.

Time Will Tell.

While walking to the barber today, my playlist landed on “Time Will Tell” by Utada Hikaru. Despite being a Japanese hit in 1999, I didn’t hear it until the early 2000s (probably ’03 or ’04, but I can’t really say). At the time, Japan was still a fairly new interest; moving here hadn’t yet crossed my mind.

Fifteen or so years later, on a lovely spring day, that song transports me back in front of my computer, surfing the web while listening to AOL’s “Japanese Pop” station, entirely unaware I’d one day be listening to it where it came from.

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Disappearing Japanese.

With English as the lingua franca, I find more and more Japanese words I took time to study and learn have either been replaced or are in the process of it. I’ve made a list of the ones I can recall right now. (Warning: This entry is all language geekery.) Continue reading

Bits of Japan.

This post will detail interesting points about Japan (or at least things I find interesting). New additions will “bump” it to the top of my feed.

  • The muzak version of the Olivia Newton-John song “Have You Never Been Mellow” is weirdly common here. I’ve heard it as hold music and store background music more than once. Continue reading

Golden Week Nagoya Trip 2018 (後編).

Sugakiya is always a treat for me.

I stayed in bed for a long time on Friday. Honestly, I often forget how nice it is to sleep on a bed instead of a futon. Once up and out, though, I made a beeline to Sugakiya for lunch and ordered the 特製 (which comes with extra チャーシュー and a soft-boiled egg). Satisfied, I hopped onto the Higashiyama Line and made my way to Sakae. Continue reading

和製英語。

I read years ago that about 11% of spoken Japanese was borrowed English. Since then, I’ve learned that they don’t necessarily use all of those borrowed words correctly; many of them have been given (for lack of a better phrase) incorrect meanings in Japanese. This is called “wasei eigo.”

Some examples: Continue reading